Pupil premium funding

INA Pupil Premium Strategy 2019-20 and Review of Pupil Premium Expenditure 2018-19

 

Disadvantages that Pupil Premium students may face at INA

It is problematic to make generalisations regarding the type of disadvantages that pupils whose family are eligible for Pupil Premium may face. Some are very high attainers; some come to school significantly behind age expected levels of attainment. Some are currently eligible for FSM; others may have been in the past. Some live in very challenging home environments; others do not. However some of the disadvantages that some INA pupils who are Pupil Premium face are:

  • Low levels of literacy and/or numeracy
  • Few books in the home
  • Cramped home conditions which make independent study a challenge
  • Insufficient and irregular supply of nourishing meals
  • Lack of money for resources to support the curriculum
  • Lack of opportunities to learn beyond the taught curriculum.

In 2018-19 Isaac Newton Academy recieved £323,428 of pupil premium funding, for 325 pupils, 52 in the primary and 272 students in the secondary, plus £21,000 sixth form bursary funding to support the staff in ensuring that students eligible for Free School Meals maximise their potential and achieve top grades in line with all students. Given the success of the summer 2018 and 2018 exam outcomes, we plan to support PP students in the same ways as we have done to date.

We anticipate receiving £332,778 of pupil premium funding for 2019-2020 for 328 pupils, 69 in the primary and 259 in the secondary, plus approximately £21,000 sixth form bursary funding.

 

Secondary Pupil Premium Funding

Quality first teaching is at the heart of raising the progress and attainment for every child at INA secondary, especially for vulnerable pupils and those receiving pupil premium funding. High quality support is given to teachers through regular line management meetings, a weekly one hour co-planning meeting for every subject team which is built into the timetable and high quality CPD based on the needs of our teachers and the pupils. Regular learning walks, book looks and opportunities for peer observation are build into the S&D for all staff.

At the Academy we have chosen to invest in smaller class sizes for Maths, English, Science and Humanities lessons in the secondary school. In 2018-19 six forms of entry were divided into 7 teaching groups in Years 8, 9 and 11, with the lower attaining groups in Maths and English comprising an average of 10-12 students. These smaller groups enabled the staff to differentiate and personalise the teaching of literacy and numeracy skills even more effectively, ensuring that students from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds were making the progress and achieving the levels required to excel across the curriculum. In Years 7 and 10 the students were also taught in 7 groups. This arrangement cost around £280,000. These grouping arrangements will continue in the academic year 2019-20.

At Isaac Newton Academy, every student learns to play a Big Band instrument: the saxophone, trumpet, trombone, keyboard, drums or guitar. Every PP student has been provided with a brand new musical instrument to take home and to use exclusively for 3 years. The cost of the Year 7, 8 and 9 PP students’ Big Band instruments is approximately £35,000.

At Isaac Newton Academy, the value of out of hours learning and attending extra-curricular classes is something that we are keenly aware of, especially for those children who do not come from backgrounds where such opportunities are being provided and funded by the family. In 2018-19 all PP students participated in at least one after school enrichment activities per week for no charge. The cost of the enrichment programme is around £25,000 per year.

We pay for weekly EWO support from Redbridge Education Welfare Team helps to ensure there are no significant differences between the attendance of pupils who receive pupil premium funding and those who do not. As well as celebrating attendance with pupils on a termly basis with awards and certificates. £3,500

Pupil Premium funding also supported our Saturday Stretch initiative, whereby university undergraduates lead seminars for INA students, introducing them to post A level style teaching and familiarising them with university life and conditions. PP students attended all of the Saturday Stretch sessions. The cost of the programme was £5,000.

Funding is spent providing a school counsellor to support students on a 1:1 basis to help remove barriers to learning. £13,300

We provided a free breakfast for Year 11 students prior to their mock exams in December 2018 and their actual GCSEs in May/June 2019 to ensure that every student had a nourishing start to the day and was in the optimal state of preparedness for their exams.

We ensured that no student missed any whole school trip/activity for financial reasons by funding PP students’ places where required. In addition, some trips and activities (e.g. the Year 7 university trip) will be paid for entirely by the school. This expenditure was approximately £5,000.

At the end of the academic year 2019 we were able to compare the progress and attainment of students eligible for PP funding against the rest of the cohort and the results indicate that the initiatives we have invested in have been beneficial:

The provisional Progress 8 (P8) score for the Year 11 cohort of students eligible for PP funding at INA in summer 2019 was +0.6 (nearly a whole GCSE grade more progress than expected for every PP student in every subject). The overall Year 11 provisional P8 score at INA was +0.75. The average national P8 score for all students in 2018 was 0.00 and the national P8 score for PP students in 2018 was -0.40.

The Attainment 8 (A8) score for the Year 11 cohort of students eligible for PP funding at INA in summer 2018 was 52. The A8 score for all students in the cohort was 55.0. The national average A8 score for all pupils in 2019 was 49.0 check and the average national A8 score for PP students in 2019 was 37.

This data shows that PP students at INA outperformed and out-progressed their non PP counterparts nationally.

In Years 7-10, internal assessment data shows that PP students made very good progress and attained high outcomes in 2018-19. In Year 10 PP A8 score was similar to non PP (45 versus 47). In Year 10 PP students equalled or surpassed the attainment of non PP students in Drama, English Language, English Literature, maths, music, physics, graphics and Spanish. In Year 9 PP students equalled the attainment of non PP students in Big Band, History, Music and PE. In Years 7 and 8, PP students’ attainment in the majority of subjects was on approximately one third to two thirds of an ARG lower than non PP. Our tracking over time shows that any gaps reduce as students go through the academy.

The attendance rate for PP students over the course of the 2018-19 year was 95.0%, compared to 94.9% for non PP students (94.9% overall). Actually 94.4% PP and 96.2% NPP – overall 95.3% - if you put Y12&13 into this – it goes down.

Given the success of the summer 2017, summer 2018 and summer 2019 exam results, we plan to support PP students in the same ways as we have done to date.

Total Secondary Spending 2018-2019 – £366,800

 

Primary Pupil Premium Funding

PP funding for the primary school in 2018-19 was used as follows:

We run an after school enrichment programme which all students attend at no charge. This cost the school around £21,000.

In addition, we subsidise half termly trips and activities for each year group for our PP students costing approximately £3,000.

We pay for weekly EWO support from Redbridge Education Welfare Team helps to ensure there are no significant differences between the attendance of pupils who receive pupil premium funding and those who do not. As well as celebrating attendance with pupils on a termly basis with awards and certificates. £3,500

The attendance rate for INAP PP pupils over the course of the 2018-19 year was 95.8%, compared to 96.5% for non PP students (96.4% overall).

We fund the support of two ELSAs across the primary who support identified pupils that are need additional emotional and behavioural wellbeing support. Funding costs support training CPD provided by the Rebridge Educational Wellbeing Team, as well as time out of class to work with individual pupils or small groups once a week. £10,000

Quality first teaching is at the heart of raising the progress and attainment for every child at INAP especially for vulnerable pupils and those receiving pupil premium funding.  High quality support is given to teachers through regular line management with a member of the senior team, high quality CPD is delivered based on the needs of our teachers and the pupils.  Regular learning walks, book looks and opportunities for peer observation are build into the S&D for all staff. Funding is therefore used to for release time for teachers and leaders in supporting them with this provision.  £60,000

Maths Mastery CPD training is provided for all new members of staff and regular CPD for all staff throughout the year through the online resources portal. Funding also allows for the Maths Lead to attend termly CPD sessions with Maths Mastery and attend termly CPD with from Ark. This ensures that all treachers are trained by Maths Mastery and supported ensuring the delivery of the programme is highly effective allowing pupils to make outstanding progress. £9,000

External Read Write Inc. CPD trainig is provided for all new members to enable them to ensure that all phonics lessons are planned and delived to the highest stadndard and allowing pupils to make outsanding progress and attainment. Funding is also used to provide an ‘out of class’ RWI Lead who delivers bespoke traingin and in class support to each teacher delivering the programme. £15,000

Funding has also been spent on an online maths programme called Maths with Parents which will enable parents to support their child at home with maths ideas and games and support parents with teaching methods and language used at INA in maths lessons. Empowering parents to support their child will help the chilren maximise their understanding and progress in mthematics. £1,500

Every student learns to play a Big Band instrument in Year 4 upward, either a trombone, dohl or trumpet. Every PP student in Years 4 and 5 will be provided with a brand new musical instrument. The cost of the instruments for 2019-20 is approximately £15,000.

Total Primary Spending: £138,000

 

In Reception, 100% of PP pupils made expected progress towards a Good Level of Development with

In Year 1 97% of pupils passed the PSC.

In Year 1, 100 compared to 77% of NPP pupils made expected progress in RWM combined. Year 1 reading 50% of the PP students are working at GD compared to 43% of NPP.

In Year 2 the 81% of PP pupils who reached age related expected attainment in reading, writing and Maths compared to 83% NPP. In reading 90% of pupils achieved age expected attaiment this we the same for NPP, however a greater percentage 62% of pupils achieved greater depth compared to 57% on NPP. 90% of PP achieved age expected attainment in writing compared to 84% NPP – however more NPP achieved a greater depth outcome. 57% of PP and NPP achieved greater depth attainment in maths.

In Year 3 96% of PP pupils ahieved age related expectations compared to 92% NPP, PP pupils also outperformed NPP students at achieving greater depth in reading. 96% of pupils achieved age related expectations in mathematics with 46% achieving greater depth – this was inlne with NPP pupils.

In Year 4 100% of PP pupils achieved expected progress in mathematics with 93% achieving age expected attainment. 87% of PP students achieved age expected attainment in writing and 80% for reading.

At the end of the academic year 2018 we were able to compare the progress and attainment of students eligible for PP funding against the rest of the cohort and the results indicate that the initiatives we have invested in have been beneficial:

 

We will evaluate the impact of this strategy in September 2020 by reviewing the attendance, progress and attainment of non PP students v PP students across all primary year groups.